Monthly Archives: January 2015

What (Some) Silicon Valley Women Think Of Newsweek

TechCrunch

I have thoughts on this Newsweek article.

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Tech has some issues. You read tradepubstoriesaboutsexualharassmentandassaultallegations so often its absurd. Newsweek, which just discovered there are only a few women in tech, sent accomplished author Nina Burleigh to investigate tech gender politics. She did an adequate job in her piece, “What Silicon Valley Thinks Of Women.”

Bandwagoning on after lengthy pieces in The New York Times and a very public campaign to collect startup diversity data, the piece contains the requisite tech sexism horror stories and well-worn accounts of women not receiving funding because they are women, but also nuggets of insight like, “One problem with the male-dominated system is that top partners have almost never been exposed to women as professional peers. Their interaction with women is limited to their wives and daughters, and maybe executive assistants.”

This is accurate: Sexism in tech is…

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Key Dates and Deadlines for Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses

Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses

DCCCD Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses

The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program teaches small business owners how to:

  • Create and execute a business plan
  • Identify and evaluate opportunities
  • Understand financial statements
  • Hire, retain and lead employees
  • Negotiate successfully
  • And more

Act now! The application deadline for summer classes is Feb. 2, 2015.

Attend one of our free information sessions at Dallas library branch locations:

1/27/15 – Food Truck Wars and Startup Adventures

Texas Intrastate Crowdfunding Rules

What It Means When Law Firms And Startups Give Away Legal Documents

TechCrunch

Editor’s note: Daniel Doktori is an associate in the New York startup practice at WilmerHale, a law firm, and the co-founder of the Harvard Law Entrepreneurship Project. 

Over the past five years, law firms in Silicon Valley, New York and Boston have put online – for free – the documents that startups need to execute basic legal transactions.

New sites, Cooley GO and WHLaunch, join first-movers Founders’ Workbench and Start-Up Forms Library, to enable entrepreneurs to incorporate their company, secure early-stage financing, hire employees and compensate them with stock options. SeriesSeed.com has emerged as an industry standard for documenting seed investments, and StartupCompanyLawer.com offers answers to over 100 frequently asked questions, along with a term-sheet generator.

But as big law firms mimic their small clients’ “freemium” business development model, they face increasing competition from startup companies seeking to disrupt the legal industry.

I interviewed several lawyers working…

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